Queen in Films

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Queen in Films

Postby Mad MikeSpit » Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:36 pm

Introduction

Like Elvis Presley, The Beatles, The Who and countless others before them - Queen would inevitably develop strong links with the celluloid artform. Yet being as unconventional as ever, they never reduced themselves to appear in hastily written films based around themselves - nor has any member acted in a film to date.

Brian May has also written the score for the French film Furia, and all of the band members have had their solo projects featured in various films since the 1980s. On top of this, a large number of the band's more famous songs (and some of the more obscure numbers) have found their way into countless movie soundtracks, and some of these have taken on a life of their own. Few can now listen to 'Bohemian Rhapsody' without thinking of Wayne's World. Countless Queen fans became interested in Metropolis thanks to both Freddie's 'Love Kills' and Queen's later video of 'Radio Ga Ga'. 'The Show must Go on' took on a new dimension in the capable hands of Jim Broadbent and Nicole Kidman, who performed an admirable cover version in Baz Lurhman's recent musical epic Moulin Rouge.

And there are other Queen songs which have been reworked specifically for inclusion in films, with Wyclef Jean providing a rap remix of 'Another One Bites The Dust' for Small Soldiers in 1998, and Brian May and Roger Taylor teaming up with none other than Robbie Williams to rerecord 'We are the Champions' to be featured in the hit comedy A Knight's Tale.

This section of the FAQ is in no way an attempt to explain in any great details every film Queen's music has appeared in, or quite why they were chosen. The movies dealt with in this section are specific films, such as those with soundtracks provided by Queen and those with a strong Queen element.
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Postby Mad MikeSpit » Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:37 pm

Movie Listing

Below is a near-complete listing of which Queen songs have appeared where. Obviously, this list requires updates periodically, but please let is know if there is anything we have missed.

A KIND OF MAGIC:
Highlander (This is an alternate version of the song and not the version, most are familiar with)
Highlander II

ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST:
Heartbreak Ridge
Sea Of Love
Small Soldiers (Performed by Queen/Wyclef Jean + Pras & Free)

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY:
National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1
Wayne's World

CRAZY LITTLE THING CALLED LOVE:
Breaking the Rules
Mr. Wrong
Son in Law

DON'T STOP ME NOW:
Blackball
Racers
Space Riders

FOOLING AROUND (A Freddie Mercury song):
Teachers

GIMME THE PRIZE:
Highlander

HAMMER TO FALL:
Highlander

HOLD ON (A duet by Freddie Mercury and Jo Dare):
Zabou

THE GREAT PRETENDER (A Freddie Mercury song):
Night and the City

I WANT TO BREAK FREE:
Iedereen Beroemd! aka Everybody Famous

INNUENDO:
La Carne

KEEP YOURSELF ALIVE:
Encino Man aka California Man

LOVE KILLS (A Freddie Mercury song):
“Buffy the Vampire Slayer Series” (A Wolf remix)
Metropolis aka Georgio Moroder Presents Fritz Lang's Metropolis
National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon (A Wolf remix)

MAN ON FIRE (A Roger Taylor):
Racers

NO TURNING BACK (A John Deacon and the Immortals song):
Biggles

ONE VISION:
Iron Eagle

ONE YEAR OF LOVE:
Highlander

PLAY THE GAME:
And the Band Played on

PRINCES OF THE UNIVERSE:
Highlander

THE SHOW MUST GO ON:
Moulin Rouge (performed by Jim Broadbent, Nicole Kidman and Anthony Weigh)

STONE COLD CRAZY:
Encino Man aka California Man

TIE YOUR MOTHER DOWN:
Super Mario Brothers

UNDER PRESSURE:
Grosse Point Blank

WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS:
A Knight's Tale (performed by Queen + Robbie Williams)
D2: The Mighty Ducks
FM
Revenge of the Nerds
“The Simpsons Series”
Two Moon Junction

WE WILL ROCK YOU:
A Knight's Tale
Any Given Sunday
Ready to Rumble

WHO WANTS TO LIVE FOREVER:
Highlander

YOU'RE MY BEST FRIEND:
Peter's Friends
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Postby Mad MikeSpit » Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:38 pm

Flash Gordon

A PRECEDENT SOUNDTRACK

“It's the first time, real rock music had been used as the soundtrack to a film that wasn't about music,” Brian May says about the soundtrack of Flash Gordon. And groundbreaking at that time, it was. Upon it's release in 1980, Flash Gordon was something new, especially to the world of Rock. Whilst on the surface the movie was simply a tongue-in-cheek high camp remake of the 1930s serial that had thrilled TV audiences week in, week out, the film was also the first time that a rock band had provided the majority of the score. “A stroke of genius,” says May of the concept of the soundtrack, “I think, because up until that time I don't think anyone had done it before.” And since then, Flash Gordon the soundtrack, has opened the door between two of the most popular branches of entertainment, music and movies. Soundtracks have become an integral part of movies, at times as popular and at others even outselling the movie.

But it was not an easy ride, as there were some severe differences of opinion during the making of the soundtrack. These differences were primarily from producer Dino De Laurentiis, who prior to this project had never heard the band's music. Yet despite the initial disappointment with the demos the band created for the soundtrack, it did not take long for the reluctant producer to change his mind. The band worked on and on in between recording sessions for The Game. And even though Queen were given a specific brief to work from, they were still essentially allowed to move in whichever direction they chose.

But inserting Flash Gordon in your CD or cassette player would instantly make one realise one is not listening to another Grease. Flash Gordon is different. “What I did was put the songs and the music . . . interweaved [sic] with little bits of dialogue and sound effects - just enough to give the feeling of watching the film when you were listening to the album," May explains. The dialogues featured in the songs did not only help listeners visualise the movie scenes but also sensationalise the movie lines among Queen maniacs! It is hard to hear of the name of Brian Blessed without that bringing to mind his made famous line “Gordon is aliiiiiiiiiivvvvvvve” from Queen’s “Flash Gordon.”

The results spoke for themselves. Upon the release of the soundtrack in December 1980, reviews were mainly positive. Record Mirror called it an ‘epic’ and Sounds described it as 'something extraordinary'. The soundtrack was a hit among the critics. The heavy use of synthesisers added to the otherworldly feel of the film, and Brian's rousing guitar work in particular, have heightened both the action and the excitement of the battle sequences, and to this day both the film and album remain well-loved cult classics.

For more information on the album itself, see [Insert Area Of FAQ Here]

MOVIE CREDITS

Directed by Mike Hodges
Produced by Dino De Laurentiis
Screenplay by Lorenzo Semple, Jr. from an adaptation by Michael Allin.
Based on the characters created by Alex Raymond, licensed by King Features Syndicate.
Music composed, performed and produced by Queen.
Original score composed and arranged by Howard Blake

Cast

Sam J. Jones -- Flash Gordon
Melody Anderson -- Dale Arden
Ornella Muti - Princess Aura
Max Von Sydow - The Emperor Ming
Topol - Dr Hans Zarkov
Timothy Dalton - Prince Barin
Brian Blessed - Prince Vultan
Peter Wyngarde - Klytus
Mariangela Melator - Kala
Richard O'Brien - Fico

PLOT SUMMARY:

Emperor Ming The Merciless (Sydow) of the planet Mongo bombards our planet with storms, floods and earthquakes for his own amusement, before sending the Moon out of orbit and on a collision course with Earth. When football champion Flash Gordon (Jones) and his beautiful co-passenger, travel agent Dale Arden's (Anderson) private plane is caught up in Ming's storm, and crashes into a research facility run by crazy Dr Hans Zarkov (Topol), they are forced at gunpoint onto his home-made rocketship and into space to take on Ming and battle to save the Earth.


TRIVIA

Sam J. Jones hammed his performance up so badly that director Mike Hodges was forced to dub his voice for the entire duration of the picture.

George Lucas wanted to remake Flash Gordon himself, but when he discovered Dino De Laurentiis had already bought the rights, he made Star Wars instead.

And on the subject of Star Wars, Kenny Baker, best known as the man inside R2-D2 was also employed as one of the 'Dwarfs' in this film.

Comedian Robbie Coltrane has a blink-and-you'll-miss- role as 'Man at Airport', shutting the door of Flash's aeroplane.

Former Blue Peter presenter Peter Duncan also has a brief role as one of the Tree Men.
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Postby Mad MikeSpit » Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:40 pm

Highlander

INTRODUCTION

After their huge success at Live Aid, Queen were eager to record once again. Their next project, which would evolve into A Kind Of Magic, would include seven songs featured in two movies, one in the war movie Iron Eagle, and six in the sci-fi epic 'Highlander' but in different forms to the now familiar album cuts.

Highlander is the directorial film debut of Russell Mulcahy, at the time a successful director of promotional videos, particularly well known for his collaborations with Duran Duran. Queen met Mulcahy in September 1985, and agreed to write and record two songs for the film, one of which would be used as the title track. By this point, Mulcahy had already begun filming, and the director was very specific as to what he needed from the band. Queen were soon in the studio recording, but not for the Highlander project! Roger had an idea for a song inspired by both Martin Luther King’s famous “I have a dream” speech and their experience at Live Aid. The result was “One Vision” which was quickly released a little over a month later.

Following the success of the “One Vision” single, the band set to work, writing and recording songs for Mulcahy's picture, and by January they had agreed to provide all the songs for the film and parts of the score, working on the latter with famed composer the late Michael Kamen. Mulcahy made rough edits of the film available to the band, and they used memorable lines from the script as inspiration for songs – “A Kind of Magic” and “Don't Lose your Head” are direct quotes by the lead characters, for example.

Driving home after seeing a section of the film, in which the lead character MacLeod loses the love of his life to old age, Brian May came up with an idea, and before he had even arrived home and using paper, pen and a small portable tape recorder, Brian had a rough outline and basic vocal demo of what would eventually become “Who Wants to Live forever'!

Work on the project was intense, yet Freddie, Roger and John all found time to help out on other projects - Freddie wrote a song for the German movie Zabou. The song, a duet with Jo Dare was entitled “Hold On”, but was only made available on the soundtrack to the movie until 2000, when it was included in The Solo Collection boxed set of Freddie's solo projects.

The final results of the project were unusual to say the least. When Highlander was released, it contained six brand new Queen songs, plus “Hammer to Fall” and sections of the score composed by the band, intertwined with the work of Michael Kamen. However, there was never an actual soundtrack to the film, despite early trailers suggesting one was forthcoming. (contradicts what we said in FAQ)

Queen's contributions to the soundtrack were, on the whole, included on A Kind of Magic (in hyperlink leading to the discography section featuring the album), along with three additional songs and, on the compact disc version, three extended/alternate mixes of songs from the album. Here, however, is a breakdown of what Queen music is actually in Highlander.

“Princes of the Universe” - Featured on the opening credits, and is similar to the album and US-single cut. However, the second half of the song is instrumental, and is inter-cut with sections of Michael Kamen's score.

“Gimme the Prize - The opening of the song is heard as The Kurgan drives around New York. It morphs into part of the score.

“One Year of Love” - The version in the film appears to be near identical to that on the album. It is featured in the scene in which MacLeod asks Brenda if he can walk her home.

“Who Wants to Live forever” - On A Kind Of Magic, and the subsequent single, Brian sings the opening verse and Freddie takes over for the rest of the song. In 'Highlander', Freddie sings the entire song. The version in 'Highlander' also has less prominent drums, with the emphasis more on the National Philharmonic Orchestra's contribution to the piece.

“Hammer to Fall” - The version in the film is the same as the one found on the 1984 album The Works.

“Don't Lose your Head'. - The most intriguing alternate version for Queen fans. The b-side to the “A Kind of Magic” single was an instrumental piece, “A Dozen Red Roses for my Darling', which bore a striking resemblance to “Don't Lose your Head” with different guitar parts however. The version of “Don't Lose your Head' featured in Highlander, as The Kurgan drives around town like a maniac terrifying the kidnapped Brenda, is somewhere in between the two songs. However, there is even more to it. Whilst driving around New York, The Kurgan jokingly sings a verse of the old standard, 'New York, New York', made famous by Frank Sinatra. Suddenly, Freddie and the band launch into a brief rendition of the song themselves (same song? Additional info?).

“A Kind of Magic” - The version featured on the movie's end credits is an alternate mix that is now officially available as the accompaniment the photo gallery on the Live at Wembley Stadium DVD, released in 2003.

Both “A Kind of Magic” and “Who Wants to Live forever” became hit singles in the UK, but it was only “Princes of the Universe”, released as a single in America instead of 'A Kind of Magic', contained any reference to Highlander in its promotional video. Clips from the film were spliced with footage of Queen performing on a replica of the set used for the final battle at the climax of the film. Leading actor Christopher Lambert joined the band as they performed the song to have a sword fight with Freddie and his trusty microphone stand! For more information on this promo, see [Insert Area Of FAQ Here]. Unfortunately, the single failed to chart, despite the innovative video!

A Kind of Magic enjoyed worldwide success, topping the chart in the UK and achieving double platinum status. The film itself also fared well in the UK. However, in America both album and film performed badly, with the former reaching a mere #46 in the Billboard charts, and the latter making only $5.9 million, almost a third of its budget. Not surprisingly then, the proper soundtrack album never materialised, and the music Queen provided for the film remains unreleased to this day. (Michael Kamen's contributions to the score are now available on a compilation CD with music from the first two sequels.)

Nevertheless, Highlander became a cult film, saved by the movie revolution caused by the introduction of VHS to home entertainment in the mid 1980s. Highlander was incredibly popular on video, and already spawned three big screen sequels and three television spin-offs. Queen's songs again featured in Highlander II, and “Princes of the Universe” became the theme for “Highlander: The Series”, which ran for five seasons between 1992 and 1997.

CREDITS

Directed by Russell Mulcahy
Produced by Peter S. Davis and William N. Panzer
Screenplay by Gregory Widen, Peter Bellwood and Larry Ferguson from a story by Gregory Widen
Music score by Michael Kamen
Songs and additonal music by Queen

Cast

Christopher Lambert - Connor MacLeod
Roxanne Heart - Benda Wyatt
Clancy Brown - The Kurgan
Sean Connery - Ramirez
Beatie Edney - Heather
Alan North - Lt. Frank Moran
Sheilia Gish - Rachel Ellenstein
Jon Polito - Det. Walter Bedsoe
Hugh Kwarshie - Sunda Kastagir
Christopher Malcom - Kirk Matunas
Pete Diamond - Fasil
Billy Hartman - Dugal MacLeod
James Cosmo - Angus MacLeod
Celia Imrie - Kate

PLOT SUMMARY

"From the dawn of time we came, moving silently down through the centuries. Living many secret lives, struggling to reach the time of the gathering, when the few who remain will battle to the last. No one has ever known we were among you . . . . . until now."

Scotland, 1536: The MacLeod clan march proudly into battle against their rivals. During the battle, one of their number, Connor MacLeod (Lambert) is mortally wounded by the mysterious giant of a man known only as The Kurgan (Brown), yet he survives. Forced out of his village by his frightened brethren, Connor learns about the secret that kept him alive when he is told by Juan Sanchez Villa-Lobos Ramirez (Connery), an Egyptian nobleman that they have a special gift. They are Immortals, men who live for centuries until there are only two remaining. They must then battle to the last in order to claim 'The Prize'. 450 years later, in present day New York, the few who remain must battle to the last - and that includes MacLeod and The Kurgan.

TRIVIA

There are several versions of the film. The standard version found in American cinemas and on video was shorter than the one found in the UK. Several editions of the 'Directors Cut' are available worldwide, and there was reportedly an alternate cut shown at the Brussels Film Festival in 1986.

Clancy Brown nearly turned down the role of Kurgan, as he was concerned that his allergy to makeup would prevent him from wearing the prosthetics required late in the film. He later went on to appear most famously in The Shawshank Redemption, written by horror master and big Queen fan Stephen King. (relevance?)

Despite heavy criticism for his acting ability, (his nationality?) Christopher Lambert's unusual cast as Connor MacLeod is understandable, considering that he had only just learnt English! He also spent time with a dialogue coach, developing an accent for the film which sounded non-specifically foreign. (unclear)

The castle where MacLeod lived with Heather is said to be the same castle used in Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

The final fight scene that takes place at the Silvercup Studios (which was also the basis for the set for the “Princes of the Universe” promo) used to be a bakery for the Silvercup Bread Company that had gone out of business a few years earlier. When first seen, the sign says 'Silvercup Studios', but when the characters arrive on the roof of the building the set designers made a mistake - and the sign simply says 'Silvercup'.
Where can I buy “New York, New York” from the Highlander Movie?
Currently the only place it can be heard is in the Highlander movie. In the Winter 1995 fan club magazine, Brian indicated that a full version does not exist. (Confirmed by Spike Edney at the 1995 OIQFC convention.) The track may appear in an upcoming box set.
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Postby Sir Didymus » Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:02 pm

All above courtesy of yours truly. :P
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Postby JLP » Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:14 pm

Did WWRY also appear in the film FM which was released circa 1978-79?

I remember it being on the soundtrack album
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Postby Sir Didymus » Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:18 pm

Jean Luc Picard wrote:Did WWRY also appear in the film FM which was released circa 1978-79?

I remember it being on the soundtrack album


I'm not sure. The name rings a bell... so its possible. That list was researched some time ago... I don't think Shaun Of The Dead had been released on dvd at the time... ;)

Though I certainly didn't add the tv series stuff in there - you'd be there all day trying to work that lot out, and they're not movies, either.
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Postby IndieJens » Mon Jan 09, 2006 7:05 pm

Jean Luc Picard wrote:Did WWRY also appear in the film FM which was released circa 1978-79?

I remember it being on the soundtrack album


Yes it was played in the film for sure :)
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Postby Sir Didymus » Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:09 pm

Here's what I originally wrote about the two films...as Mike's done a bit of a rewrite.

FLASH GORDON

Upon it's release in 1980, Flash Gordon was something new, history in the making. Whilst on the surface it was simply a tongue in cheek high camp remake of the 1930s serials that had thrilled cinema audiences week in, week out, the film was also the first time that a rock band had provided the majority of the score. Hit singles from films had long since been common, and artists had often provided a signature theme song, but to provide incidental music for a film that wasn't even about music was a revelation.

Brian May: "It was the director Mike Hodge's idea," May explains today. "A stroke of genius, I think, because up until that time I don't think anyone had done it before. I still feel quite proud of that soundtrack, because it's the first time real rock music had been used as the soundtrack to a film that wasn't about music. It was quite a precedent. And even within the brief that we were given there were some severe differences of opinion."

This difference of opinion was primarily from producer Dino De Laurentiis, who prior to this project had never heard the band's music. Yet despite his initial disappointment with the demos the band created for the soundtrack, it did not take long for him to change his mind. The band worked on and on in between recording sessions for 'The Game'. Despite being given a specific brief to work from, they were still essentially allowed to move in whichever direction they chose.

Brian May: "Mike had great confidence. He said just go away and give us some sort of idea which direction you'll be heading... I suppose I'm the one who got the most into it. If someone pushes a concept at me, immediately the brian just starts working and I can hear stuff. I could hear that theme immediately. What I did was put the songs and the music - what there was of it - interweaved with little bits of dialogue and sound effects - just enough to give the feeling of watching the film when you were listening to the album."

The results spoke for themselves upon the release of the soundtrack in December 1980. Reviews were mainly positive, with Record Mirror claiming it was an epic and Sounds believing it to be 'something extrodinary'. It's heavy use of synthesisers added to the otherworldly feel of the film, and Brian's rousing guitar work in particular heightened both the action and excitement of the battle sequences, and to this day both the film and album remain well-loved cult classics.

HIGHLANDER

After their triumphant performance at Live Aid, Queen were eager to record once again. Their next project, which would become 'A Kind Of Magic', would include three songs not included in any movie project, one which found its way into war based movie 'Iron Eagle', and six which were featured, in different form to the now familiar album cuts, in the sci-fi fantasy epic 'Highlander'.

'Highlander' was the directorial film debut of Russell Mulcahy, at the time a successful director or promotional videos, particularly well known for his collaborations with Duran Duran. Queen met Mulcahy in September, 1985, and agreed that they would write and record two songs for the film, one of which would be used as the title track. By this point, Mulcahy had already begun filming , and the director was very specific as to what he needed from the band. Queen were soon in the studio recording, but not for the 'Highlander' project! Roger had an idea for a song inspired by both Martin Luther King and the magnitude of Live Aid, and 'One Vision' was born and quickly released the single just over a month later.

Following the success of the 'One Vision' single, the band set to work writing and recording songs for Mulcahy's picture, and by January they had agreed to provide all the songs for the film and parts of the score, working on the latter with famed composer Michael Kamen. Mulcahy made rough edits of the film available to the band, and they used memorable lines from the script as inspiration for songs - 'A Kind Of Magic' and 'Don't Lose Your Head' are direct quotes from the lead characters, for example.

Driving home after seeing a section of the film, in which the lead character MacLeod loses the love of his life to old age, Brian May came up with an idea, and using paper, pen and a small portable tape recorder he had a rough outline and basic vocal demo of what would eventually become 'Who Wants To Live Forever' before he had even arrived home!

Work on the project was intense, yet Freddie, Roger and John all found time to help out on other projects - Freddie wrote a song for the German movie 'Zabou'. The song, a duet with Jo Dare was entitled 'Hold On', but was only made available on the soundtrack to 'Zabou' until 2000, when it was included in 'The Solo Collection' boxed set of Freddie's musical endeavours outside of Queen. Freddie also found time to work with Billy Squier on two tracks, 'Love Is The Hero' and 'Lady With A Tenor Sax', both of which also feature in 'The Solo Collection'. Meanwhile Roger co-produced an album for rock band Magnum with David Richards, and John cowrote a song with Errol Brown of Hot Chocolate.

The final results of the project were unusual to say the least. When the film was released, it contained six brand new Queen songs, plus 'Hammer To Fall' and sections of the score composed by the band intertwined with the work of Michael Kamen. However, there was never a true soundtrack to the film, despite early trailers suggesting one was forthcoming.

Queen's contributions to the soundtrack were, on the whole, included on the 'A Kind Of Magic' album, along with three additional songs and, on the compact disc version, three extended/alternate mixes of songs from the album. For more information on the 'A Kind Of Magic' album itself, see [Insert Area Of FAQ Here]. Here, however, is a breakdown of what Queen music is actually in 'Highlander'.

'Princes Of The Universe' - Featured on the opening credits, and is similar to the album and US-single cut. However, the second half of the song is intrumental, and is intercut with sections of Michael Kamen's score.

'Gimme The Prize' - The opening of the song is heard as The Kurgan drives around New York. It morphs into part of the score.

'One Year Of Love' - The version in the film appears to be near identical to that on the album. It is featured in the scene in which MacLeod asks Brenda if he can walk her home.

'Who Wants To Live Forever' - On the 'A Kind Of Magic' album, and the subsequent single, Brian sings the opening verse and Freddie takes over for the rest of the song. In 'Highlander', Freddie sings the entire song. The version in 'Highlander' also has less prominant drums, with the emphasis more on the National Philharmonic Orchestra's contribution to the piece.

'Hammer To Fall' - The version in the film is the same as the one found on the 1984 album 'The Works'.

'Don't Lose Your Head'. - The most intriguing alternate version for Queen fans. The b-side to the 'A Kind Of Magic' single was an instrumental piece, 'A Dozen Red Roses For My Darling', which bore a striking resemblance to 'Don't Lose Your Head' with different guitar parts and a complete lack of lead or background vocals. The version of 'Don't Lose Your Head' featured in 'Highlander', as The Kurgan drives around town like a maniac terrorfying the kidnapped Brenda, is somewhere in between the two songs. However, there is even more to it. Whilst driving around New York, The Kurgan jokingly sings a verse of the old standard, 'New York, New York', made famous by Frank Sinatra. Suddenly, Freddie and the band launch into a brief rendition of the song themselves.

'A Kind Of Magic' - The version featured on the movie's end credits is an alternate mix that remained unreleased officially until it was chosen to back the photo gallery on the 'Live At Wembley Stadium' dvd in 2003.

Both 'A Kind Of Magic' and 'Who Wants To Live Forever' became hit singles in the UK, but it was only 'Princes Of The Universe', released as a single in America in place of 'A Kind Of Magic', which contained any reference to 'Highlander' in its promotional video. Clips from the film were spliced with footage of Queen performing on a replica of the set used for the final battle at the climax of the film, and leading actor Christopher Lambert joined the band as they performed the song to have a sword fight against Freddie and his trusty microphone stand! For more information on this promo, see [Insert Area Of FAQ Here]. Unfortunately, the single failed to chart, despite the innovative video!

Upon its release, the 'A Kind Of Magic' album contained the legend "Some songs on this album appear in different form in the film 'Highlander'." The album itself enjoyed much success in most parts of the world, topping the charts in the UK and achieving double platinum status. The film itself also fared well in the UK. However, in America both album and film performed badly, with the former reaching a mere #46 in the Billboard charts, and the latter making back only $5.9million of its $16million budget. Not surprisingly then, the proper soundtrack album never materialised, and the music Queen provided for the film remains unreleased to this day. (Michael Kamen's contributions to the score are now available on a compilation cd with music from the first two sequels.)

Nevertheless, the film became a cult hit, and the explosion of vhs in the mid 1980s became its saviour. 'Highlander' became incredibly popular on video, and already spawned three big screen sequels and three television spin offs. Queen's songs again featured in 'Highlander II', and 'Princes Of The Universe' became the theme for 'Highlander: The Series', which ran for five seasons between 1992 and 1997.
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Postby MC Taz Man » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:49 pm

What about the hilarious Shaun of the Dead... It features a Queen song

:oops: :oops: :oops: tho I can't remember which song, although I have it on DVD :oops: :oops: :oops:
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Postby luigi_pirex » Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:00 pm

MC Taz Man wrote:What about the hilarious Shaun of the Dead... It features a Queen song

:oops: :oops: :oops: tho I can't remember which song, although I have it on DVD :oops: :oops: :oops:


Two songs actually - "Don't stop me now" (the amazing jukebox scene) and "You're my best friend" (the final credits) ;)
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Postby Helena » Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:06 pm

Just wondering, which bit on Super Mario Brothers, does it have Tie Your Mother Down, on it?? I can't recall every hearing it.... :shock:
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Postby Chris. » Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:36 pm

"You're my best friend" also features in an episode of the simpsons which I saw a couple of days ago on sky one...
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Postby JLP » Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:50 pm

Chris. wrote:"You're my best friend" also features in an episode of the simpsons which I saw a couple of days ago on sky one...


but like Didy says he has not included TV programmes.

I just wonder if we think something should be added we might be better posting it in the feedback thread otherwise these threads are gonna end up going on and on and on
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Postby Chris. » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:12 pm

WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS:
A Knight's Tale (performed by Queen + Robbie Williams)
D2: The Mighty Ducks
FM
Revenge of the Nerds
“The Simpsons Series”
Two Moon Junction
he did once.
(If I'm thinking of the same simpsons)
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