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Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:13 am
by soxtalon
No I agree there are some wonderful ideas! I don't mean to complete slight the album. I can still find a lot to like when I put it on...but I do feel like it could have been much more...complete....

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 6:58 am
by nickguy1
Queenify Mr Bad Guy please!

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 8:49 am
by Oret
nickguy1 wrote:Queenify Mr Bad Guy please!


Please don't!

The "queenified" tracks on MIH were overproduced, making the original versions just as listenable.

There is a middle road between those two, but QP doesn't know where it is.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 2:54 pm
by Echoplex
I think Mr Bad Guy is proof that left to his own devices Freddie was less of a perfectionist, and maybe even a little less adept at working on his own compared to Brian and Roger.

I don't dislike the album but I'm sure it would have been much better had it been a Queen album. Freddie even got the guitarist to try and emulate Brian's playing. Freddie had a huge musical talent, but I think the true evidence of that talent was only visible when working with other people on a level playing field.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 9:04 pm
by Leigh Burne
Oret wrote:The "queenified" tracks on MIH were overproduced, making the original versions just as listenable.

"I Was Born to Love You" is a bit over-the-top, granted, but the Queen version of "Made in Heaven" is absolutely superb.

While I'm not sure I like the idea of them redoing a "Queen" version of Mr. Bad Guy, the results on Made in Heaven force me to admit I'd be damn excited to hear it if they ever did.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:22 pm
by soxtalon
Echoplex wrote:I think Mr Bad Guy is proof that left to his own devices Freddie was less of a perfectionist, and maybe even a little less adept at working on his own compared to Brian and Roger.




I believe this statement definitely needs a huge quantifier of "at this time". I think a 70s solo album Freddie would be as perfectionist as any of them. 1981-1985 was admittedly a time when Freddie was more interested in the club life than the studio life if the stories hold. So it was probably the worst time for Freddie to have attempted a solo album.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 3:38 pm
by musicalprostitute
soxtalon wrote:No I agree there are some wonderful ideas! I don't mean to complete slight the album. I can still find a lot to like when I put it on...but I do feel like it could have been much more...complete....


Agreed. Such a shame Freddie never added those last few finishing touches. I still find it to this day a beautifully kooky album though...and very, very Freddie.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 9:36 am
by TheHero
Maybe the virus affected his song writing without even knowing it? Just a thought..

The best Queen music is from 1973-1980, most people agree with that.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 12:10 pm
by dearmrmurdoch
soxtalon wrote:
Echoplex wrote:I think Mr Bad Guy is proof that left to his own devices Freddie was less of a perfectionist, and maybe even a little less adept at working on his own compared to Brian and Roger.




I believe this statement definitely needs a huge quantifier of "at this time". I think a 70s solo album Freddie would be as perfectionist as any of them.


Exactly - odd that many on here don't seem to grasp that. Kind of hilarious and dumb to refer to a solo album from 1985 to somehow try and diminish the talents of someone who had already released 11 albums. Queen albums had already trailed off by that point.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 2:54 pm
by BitterTears
Barcelona was a cracker though (imo). If that was a renewed enthusiasm from Fred because he was working with Monterrat or because of the efforts of Mike Moran (or both), I'm not sure.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 6:19 pm
by Leigh Burne
TheHero wrote:The best Queen music is from 1973-1980, most people agree with that.

I certainly wouldn't.

They may undoubtedly have been more consistent in their early days, but their best stuff from their later years is easily the equal of their best stuff from earlier on.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 7:56 pm
by JLP
Leigh Burne wrote:
TheHero wrote:The best Queen music is from 1973-1980, most people agree with that.

I certainly wouldn't.

They may undoubtedly have been more consistent in their early days, but their best stuff from their later years is easily the equal of their best stuff from earlier on.


Really? Other than Innuendo, their later stuff is not a patch on the first 5 albums.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 3:01 pm
by Echoplex
dearmrmurdoch wrote:
soxtalon wrote:
Echoplex wrote:I think Mr Bad Guy is proof that left to his own devices Freddie was less of a perfectionist, and maybe even a little less adept at working on his own compared to Brian and Roger.




I believe this statement definitely needs a huge quantifier of "at this time". I think a 70s solo album Freddie would be as perfectionist as any of them.


Exactly - odd that many on here don't seem to grasp that. Kind of hilarious and dumb to refer to a solo album from 1985 to somehow try and diminish the talents of someone who had already released 11 albums. Queen albums had already trailed off by that point.


I don't need to quantify anything. It's clear that I'm talking about Freddie's work on Mr Bad Guy. I could refer to the above comment and claim it's hilarious and dumb that someone, to prove their point, claims Freddie released 11 albums before Bad Guy. He didn't he was part of a band who wrote, recorded and released 11 albums. There is a huge difference which is why there is a difference in the finished product. Queen at their creative 80's low point were better than Freddie on is own.

Freddie made a choice to produce a solo album, he as did his record company believed he could produce something brilliant. He didn't. The huge advance he was paid was not proportionate to its sales especially comparing what Queen sold in relation to their advances.

The argument mentioned earlier that he lost interest and if he hadn't the album would have been much better isn't accurate either. He spent as long as he could and put as much as he could into writing, recording and producing the album. He also spent a huge amount on promotion and video production for the singles. He lost interest when it became clear the albums sales lagged behind anything Queen were shifting at the time. Once it became clear that Mr Bad Guy wasn't going to be Freddie's Thriller or In The Air Tonight he walked away from it.

As I pointed out in my original post Freddie had huge amounts of talent but he needed to work with people who were equally talented. He was, I'm sure, very aware of this especially after Mr Bad Guy. So Barcelona was conceived with the help of Mike Moran and Monserrat Caballe amazing voice which like working with Queen inspired Freddie to push his talent as far as possible which is why Barcelona is a much better album than Mr Bad Guy.

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:01 am
by soxtalon
It wasn't as clear as you thought it was obviously. When you say "Left to his own devices..." it makes it sound as an overreaching statement.

The argument that he lost interest - you can say it's inaccurate but according to "The Great Pretender" doc it is accurate...

Re: Queen as a legacy act

PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:28 am
by Jimi
I think Mr Bad Guy is shit
The cover is shit.
If it wasn't Fred you wouldn't play it more than once.