Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

The studio albums, live releases, compilations and box sets
User avatar
Kes
Moderator
Posts: 3496
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:04 pm

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Kes »

PS. I despise samples. They're f*cking lazy ways of trying to make a hit out of an otherwise lacking framework. I dislike Ice Ice Baby, I dislike that end bit on the Jazz album, and I dislike the Wyclef version of AOBTD, even if it went stellar on Pluto.

I haven't got anything against other stuff Wyclef Jean has been involved in, but that hasn't relied on pissing on a Picasso.

User avatar
Sir Didymus
Posts: 305
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:59 pm
Location: Manchester, UK
Contact:

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Sir Didymus »

Kes wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 1:00 pm PS. I despise samples. They're f*cking lazy ways of trying to make a hit out of an otherwise lacking framework. I dislike Ice Ice Baby, I dislike that end bit on the Jazz album, and I dislike the Wyclef version of AOBTD, even if it went stellar on Pluto.

I haven't got anything against other stuff Wyclef Jean has been involved in, but that hasn't relied on pissing on a Picasso.
Sampling is a big part of that whole genre of music, though. It has been since the early days with acts like Run DMC and Beastie Boys. Hell, of the two biggest Fugees hits, one is a cover version, and the other used a sample of Enya that wasn't authorised leading to her getting the full publishing royalties for the track.

I think sampling can be done incredibly well... but then I genuinely love The KLF, so I would say that. ;)

User avatar
Kes
Moderator
Posts: 3496
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:04 pm

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Kes »

Generational thing.

I remember working with a bloke, and Under Pressure came on. He moaned like f*ck saying "Why do they play this shit?" when he realised it wasn't Vanilla f*cking Ice.

Sampling is just an excuse for people who quite likely know nothing about sheet music, or playing instruments, to create something, with minimal effort, on their parts.

You could say Walk This Way is a reasonable construction, but a lot of it is Joe Perry and Steven Tyler re-recording their parts afresh to fit in with the sampled backing track.

User avatar
WeeMann
Moderator
Posts: 672
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:40 am

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by WeeMann »

Just to kill this discussion, this has to be the best version I've heard of WWRY.


User avatar
Sir Didymus
Posts: 305
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:59 pm
Location: Manchester, UK
Contact:

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Sir Didymus »

Kes wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:18 pm Sampling is just an excuse for people who quite likely know nothing about sheet music, or playing instruments, to create something, with minimal effort, on their parts.
I think that part is a bit of a sweeping generalisation. From artists recycling bits of their back catalogue into new songs (eg. Eurythmics on '17 Again', or Alice Cooper on 'Welcome 2 My Nightmare'), to bands like Portishead and Space in the 1990s using obscure clips and sounds to enhance their complex soundscapes, it's just another form of interpolation - the same thing Brian May used to "write" 'See What a Fool I've Been', or John Lennon used to think up 'Come Together'.

Yes, there are some terrible, terrible examples out there of bad music being made popular because of the sample - Vanilla Ice being perhaps the poster boy for it. But it isn't always terrible.

User avatar
WeeMann
Moderator
Posts: 672
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:40 am

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by WeeMann »

Sir Didymus wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:55 pm
Kes wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:18 pm Sampling is just an excuse for people who quite likely know nothing about sheet music, or playing instruments, to create something, with minimal effort, on their parts.
I think that part is a bit of a sweeping generalisation. From artists recycling bits of their back catalogue into new songs (eg. Eurythmics on '17 Again', or Alice Cooper on 'Welcome 2 My Nightmare'), to bands like Portishead and Space in the 1990s using obscure clips and sounds to enhance their complex soundscapes, it's just another form of interpolation - the same thing Brian May used to "write" 'See What a Fool I've Been', or John Lennon used to think up 'Come Together'.

User avatar
Kes
Moderator
Posts: 3496
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:04 pm

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Kes »

I knew "that" would come up.

It's maybe a little bit different when an artist does it to their own material, but I wouldn't say that is a classic Roger Taylor track.

User avatar
Sir Didymus
Posts: 305
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:59 pm
Location: Manchester, UK
Contact:

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Sir Didymus »

WeeMann wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:07 pm
Sir Didymus wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:55 pm
Kes wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 2:18 pm Sampling is just an excuse for people who quite likely know nothing about sheet music, or playing instruments, to create something, with minimal effort, on their parts.
I think that part is a bit of a sweeping generalisation. From artists recycling bits of their back catalogue into new songs (eg. Eurythmics on '17 Again', or Alice Cooper on 'Welcome 2 My Nightmare'), to bands like Portishead and Space in the 1990s using obscure clips and sounds to enhance their complex soundscapes, it's just another form of interpolation - the same thing Brian May used to "write" 'See What a Fool I've Been', or John Lennon used to think up 'Come Together'.
Raise ya.


User avatar
Sir Didymus
Posts: 305
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:59 pm
Location: Manchester, UK
Contact:

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Sir Didymus »

Come to think of it, Bowie's the real trickster when it came to this stuff. He often recycled lyrics and melodies on his songs. "Sister Midnight" became "Red Money". "All the Young Dudes" was played backwards and became "Move On". He quoted "All the Madmen" in "The Buddha of Suburbia". He reworked lots of his songs in the early 00s.

And he didn't just steal from himself... one of his very last songs pays homage to the man who influenced him first - quoting Tommy Steele's "Handful of Songs" on the 2016 song "Killing a Little Time". And that's before we get into how much the look in this video inspired his entire Let's Dance era schtick.




Dali
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon May 25, 2020 8:04 pm

Re: Greatest Hits III [Special Edition]

Post by Dali »

Kes wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 11:54 am Well, he would. He wrote the thing.

Takes my mind back to Queen Rocks. Did how valid a rock song a track was, have more bearing on the tracklisting, against who wrote it? There's a LOT of Brian songs on there.
I'm guessing that the style definitely had some impact. I mean, it's called Queen Rocks (+one piano ballad, but whatever). I'm racking my brain, but I don't think John ever wrote a hard rock song, did he?

I always assumed that this was part of the reason why John had a falling out with the other two.

Post Reply