Put some horse on your fork

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Put some horse on your fork

Postby mikespit » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:22 pm

Had some lately?
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Tarkus » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:35 pm

I must admit, I find it rather amusing how shocking people seem to be that they're eating horse- as if it's any different from eating cow, sheep or pig. It's as if somehow eating one animal is OK, but not another. I don't touch meat myself, so I don't have that problem.
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby LittleBabyNothing » Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:28 pm

Tarkus wrote:I must admit, I find it rather amusing how shocking people seem to be that they're eating horse- as if it's any different from eating cow, sheep or pig. It's as if somehow eating one animal is OK, but not another. I don't touch meat myself, so I don't have that problem.


There's nothing shocking about eating horsemeat - if you're eating it of your own free will.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Lino » Wed Feb 13, 2013 1:03 pm

Well I already ate horse and it's pretty different from beef: more intense, much more fiber, tougher... but I like horse meat, it's very delicious I must say. Go to some places in Italy and you'll eat it. In Sardinia and in Italy, in general, you can find it easily in the supermarket. And it's very rich in iron.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Tarkus » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:14 pm

LittleBabyNothing wrote:
Tarkus wrote:I must admit, I find it rather amusing how shocking people seem to be that they're eating horse- as if it's any different from eating cow, sheep or pig. It's as if somehow eating one animal is OK, but not another. I don't touch meat myself, so I don't have that problem.


There's nothing shocking about eating horsemeat - if you're eating it of your own free will.

I perfectly agree with you- if I ate meat, I'd have no problem with it at all- meat is meat. It's all dead animal, so to me there's no difference.
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Belle Leisha » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:24 pm

The problem was definitely in the labeling of beef, rather than in the actual eating of horse.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby LittleBabyNothing » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:43 pm

Belle Leisha wrote:The problem was definitely in the labeling of beef, rather than in the actual eating of horse.


That's what I meant. My wording was awkward :P
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Elessar » Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:16 pm

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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Kes » Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:54 pm

I don't get this 'meat is meat' argument.

You wouldn't say it was OK to amputate your next door neighbour's leg and badge that up as beef, would you?

If f*cking Europe are going to tell us that you can't call a drink Champagne unless it is made in a certain area of France, then they can't tell us it's OK for their farmers to throw Nellie in with Daisy, and call it beef.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Elessar » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:04 pm

Kes wrote:I don't get this 'meat is meat' argument.

You wouldn't say it was OK to amputate your next door neighbour's leg and badge that up as beef, would you?

If f*cking Europe are going to tell us that you can't call a drink Champagne unless it is made in a certain area of France, then they can't tell us it's OK for their farmers to throw Nellie in with Daisy, and call it beef.


In terms of false labelling, people are right to be upset. People would be right to be upset if they found out that they Welsh lamb was actually from England, or their British beef was imported from Ireland, and it would still be the same species! But in terms of some sort of moral objection to eating horse, it's a bit odd. I personally probably wouldn't choose to eat horse, but if I found out afterwards that I had inadvertently eaten some, I'd feel a bit hypocritical if I suddenly felt guilty for eating a horse.

As for champagne - it is a region of France. You don't see Jameson's trying to call itself Scotch.
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Kes » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:33 pm

I see New Zealand cheddar, and locally manufactured variants throughout the supermarkets of Europe, and I thought Cheddar was a town in f*cking Somerset, famous for a style of cheese. No different in principle to someone locally making a particular type of sparkling wine.

It's one rule for us, and a different one for somewhere else.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Elessar » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:03 pm

Kes wrote:I see New Zealand cheddar, and locally manufactured variants throughout the supermarkets of Europe, and I thought Cheddar was a town in f*cking Somerset, famous for a style of cheese. No different in principle to someone locally making a particular type of sparkling wine.

It's one rule for us, and a different one for somewhere else.


I think it's more a case of there being different rules for wines - wine tends to be produced on the continent rather than in the UK, so perhaps it feels like it's one rule for the Europeans and another for us. The reality is that the main countries affected by any champagne-related strictness are other European countries - the Italians calling their sparkling wine Prosecco rather than Champagne. I know that if I ordered a bottle of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo and it arrived with a label informing me it had been made in France, I'd send it back.
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Kes » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:03 pm

The principle is the same, whether it's champagne, cheddar cheese or a lump of horse meat, you should call it what it is, and not mislead people with a view to strike a sale.

If a packet of hot dogs tells you that it's 60% chicken, or pork, or beef, then they "should" have the common decency to explain extremely clearly WHAT part of the animal that 60% really is, like beaks, organs, windpipes, arseholes, and other "mechanically reclaimed" unsaleable parts, and what the other 40% of the item they are selling is.

This applies to companies like Bird's Eye, equally as much as it applies to Iceland, and Findus, and because of their inability to say clearly what goes into their products, that's one shop I really DO avoid buying stuff from.
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Loretta » Sun Feb 17, 2013 3:43 am

My local bakery used to sell meat pies. And they were delicious.

You can no longer buy meat pies, as they have to specify what the meat actually is.

And look where that's got us.

I wouldn't eat my neighbours leg though. It's gammy.
 
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Re: Put some horse on your fork

Postby Lino » Sun Feb 17, 2013 4:11 am

go to the butcher's and you'll know what is there and what the guy with the huge knife can cut to you.
my granny did best... I saw her killing chickens in her kitchen. And great soup or meat it gave us all.
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